Gold Reliquary That Once Held French Queen's Heart Stolen - Gainesville Coins News
No Minimum order! We accept Pay with Credit Card
Call Us: (813) 482-9300 Mon-Fri 9:00AM-6:00PM EST
Login or Register
Log into your account
About Gainesville Coins ®
Billions Of Dollars Bought And Sold A+ BBB Rating 10+ Years No Hidden Fees Or Commissions All Inventory Ships Directly From Our Vault

Gold Reliquary That Once Held French Queen's Heart Stolen

blog | Published On by
Gold Reliquary That Once Held French Queen's Heart Stolen

One of the most treasured—and, indeed, one of the strangest—gold artifacts in France has been stolen from a museum.

The story behind this gold reliquary (something that holds a relic) and its former contents is the stuff of legend.

An Outrageous Museum Heist Goes Unsolved

robbery heistLast weekend, a group of robbers broke through the window of a museum in Nantes and absconded with the priceless artifact.

Although they tripped an alarm during their brazen theft, the criminals have yet to be apprehended or even identified.

The intricate gold metalwork encasing was stolen along with a number of gold coins and a Hindu gold statuette. It had been moved to a special glass display only a week before being stolen.

English-language French news outlets around the world covered the story, from Australia to America.

The reliquary has been housed at the Dobrée Museum for well over 100 years and is considered by many to be a national treasure of France.

Authorities are pleading for the irreplaceable piece of history to be returned, but such a resolution appears unlikely.

The Incredible Legacy of Queen Anne of Brittany

Anne de Bretagne, the only woman to have ever married two different French kings, is the subject of the one-of-a-kind item.

It is made from approximately 100 grams of gold (a little more than three troy ounces) and is intricately fabricated with a crown adorned with fleurs-de-lis, the three-petal lilly from the old French coat of arms.

2014 marked the 500th anniversary of Queen Anne's death. By all accounts, she was a shrewd and independent woman, particularly for her time period.

Image source: The History Blog archives

In addition to the piece's rich artistic value, it rather incredibly was used to hold the preserved heart of Queen Anne.

Inscriptions on the container reveal the deep admiration the queen's subjects had for her:

"In this little vessel of fine gold, pure and clean, rests a heart greater than any lady in the world ever had. Anne was her name, twice queen in France, Duchess of the Bretons, royal and sovereign."

Moreover, her (second) husband Louis XII supposedly wept for eight straight days following her death. Her funerary ceremony lasted an astounding forty days.

The reliquary was buried with Anne's parents in Paris, as per her wishes.

Her heart was wantonly discarded from the vessel during the upheaval of the French Revolution. Luckily, the gold container itself was spared from destruction.

It has primarily resided in Nantes, the queen's hometown in Upper Brittany, for five centuries.

As the Duchess of Brittany in her own right, Anne married King Charles VIII just before her 15th birthday. After Charles's death, she was then wedded to his cousin King Louis XII in accordance with her original marriage agreement.

 

UPDATE (04/23/2018): French police have recovered the gold reliquary and other items stolen from the museum. Two suspects are in custody but two more are at large. The apparent motivation for the theft is "petty crime."

 

The opinions and forecasts herein are provided solely for informational purposes, and should not be used or construed as an offer, solicitation, or recommendation to buy or sell any product.

About the Author

Everett Millman

Everett Millman

Analyst, Commodities and Finance
Managing Editor

Everett has been the head content writer and market analyst at Gainesville Coins since 2013. He has a background in History and is deeply interested in how gold and silver have historically fit into the financial system.

In addition to blogging, Everett's work has been featured in CoinWeek, Advisor Perspectives, Wealth Management, Activist Post, and has been referenced by the Washington Post.

This site uses cookies for analytics and to deliver personalized content. By continuing to browse our site, you agree that you have read and understand our Privacy Policy.